Clay Siegall & Seattle Genetics Are Fighting Against Cancer

Dr. Clay B. Siegall, Ph.D. is currently President and Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Seattle Genetics, Inc. In 1998 he co-founded Seattle Genetics. He has obtained a B.S. in Zoology at University of Maryland and received his Ph. D for genetics at George Washington University. Seattle Genetics is a revolutionary company that is investigating the ways in which we treat cancer. They are coming up with new technologies and science which help get us closer to a cure. They provide for patients and healthcare professionals clinical trials, up to date medical information, clinical data requests and independent medical education.

Dr Siegall frequently quotes and shares information from NPR (an independent news and information provider). His most recent share of information discusses Bears Ears National Monument in Utah. There is a huge discussion as to whether or not it should be kept up, shrunk, or tore down entirely. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is having to make the recommendation.

Another blog post shared from NPR by Dr Siegall discusses California’s law in regards to Aid-In-Dying. Many facilities around the state are participating in the project where the physician is allowed to prescribe a lethal medication to a patient who wishes to end their life. Some patients are finding it incredibly difficult to find a physician that will help because a physician can turn it down and refuse to give the prescription. Even if the physicians are willing to prescribe the medication, they are concerned about how they are perceived by the public. They don’t want to be stamped that they are the go-to person if you want to die.

Dr. Clay Siegall is a scientist that emphasizes his work on finding a cure for cancer. He has influenced Seattle Genetics in creating antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), which was approved by the FDA in 2011. He has also contributed in a way by encouraging public and private funding, which has given the company approximately $1.2 billion dollars in 2001.

He observed his father go through cancer and noticed the limited technology they had to treat it. Through observing his fathers experience he has focused on finding a way to make cancer treatment more promising and possible for more cancer patients. His life work and current career is driven by passion and personal experience.